New Titles for New Families



 

Fill your child’s summer with games, songs, noises and swimming!

Oh No, George! by Chris Haughton (Candlewick). Come and see this gem of a book! Vivid retro images of a red and purple hound tempted with every turn of the page by all the classic potholes for dogs—a cake on the table, a cat chase, a bed of flowers. “I hope I’ll be good,” thinks George. Teaching a puppy to behave must be like teaching a young child to behave. What will he do? 

Hide and Seek by Il Sung Na (Knopf). With consummate skill, Na introduces this tension building game to the youngest players. While elephant counts away, all the other jungle animals scramble to find places to hide. The text gets larger as time is running out! Extra features abound, like a new butterfly on each page as the counting progresses. It might take a few reads for the kids to find the camouflaged chameleon on every page as well. Very clever.

Trains Go by Steve Light (Chronicle). A perfect read aloud for boys and girls. This is a book of NOISES.  Some trains go “CHUGGA chugga chugga!” and others go “Clang clang clang!” A lively story with a unique long shape and bright illustrations will captivate any audience.

Two Little Monkeys by Mem Fox, illus. by Jill Barton (Simon & Schuster). Remember the finger game about the two little dickie birds sitting in a tree?  Here’s a new version of that song, starring two monkeys, “one named Cheeky, one named Chee.”  Strong language development coupled with bright pictures that act out the story lines make this a good choice for toddlers. Mem Fox’s pitch perfect story line with adorable baby monkeys and a swinging rhythm make it great. Don’t miss this one.

Here are two suggestions for Book Apps for the youngest set.

Harold and the Purple Crayon by Trilogy Studios.  This classic story makes the transition to an app without losing the magical brilliance of the original. What will Harold draw next? The pacing is slower for younger children, and the artwork is incredibly crisp and alive. The “touch tale” mode allows the child to “be” Harold’s crayon and color the line he has drawn. Nostalgic adults may steal the iPad from Junior.

Stewie the Duck Learns to Swim by Stew Leonards. A child’s first guide to water safety, this app is based on the book by the same name. There is a read-to-me audio version that can be turned off for independent reading and play with animations. Also included are a memory game and a sing-along. The Leonards lost their children by drowning and are offering this app for free.

While driving her older children around in Leawood, Julie Hubble wishes she were reading books to infants.

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